How to Make the Hospital a Less Stressful Experience

No one likes to go to the hospital. In fact, some dread it so much, they don’t go even when they know they should. Even the best hospitals would be hard pressed to produce a patient experience that did not provoke at least a little anxiety, but many medical facilities are not up to snuff these days and that just makes things worse.

Here are a few ways such places could improve the experience:

Emergency Room

This is a part of the hospital particularly dreaded by most people, and for good reason. The waits can be endless, there tend to be many, many people there at any given time, very few doctors and nurses, and communication is often lacking. People here are often in serious pain and worried about their immediate health; stacking them up on gurneys in a hallway for hours on end does nothing to alleviate that stress.

Hospitals need to expand their facilities, so such things do not happen. They should also schedule enough doctors and nurses so that there are enough to accommodate patient volume during peak times.

Cleaner Rooms

Many hospitals are constantly running over capacity, so as soon as one patient gets out of a room, another one immediately moves in. However, that is no excuse for the occasionally filthy conditions. Also, wear and tear in bathrooms and sink areas must to be addressed. A room needs to appear clean and welcoming; some look more like a third-rate motel.

Better Communication

Some doctors and nurses are so overworked, they rush through examinations and patient consultations. That leaves them feeling confused and stressed. It is imperative to fully communicate all details regarding even the most basic procedures. Medical personnel should also be willing to answer any and all questions, while making sure that patients understand this information.

Sympathy Flowers 101

Flowers have been given as a sign of sympathy following death for thousands of years. The intention is to introduce a feeling of color and life back into a time when sadness is prevailing for friends and family of the deceased. While there are no hard and fast rules about how this is done, the following suggestions can help if you are not sure:

It is a traditional to send flowers to a funeral home or wake, but you can also send them directly to the family and/or primary person who is grieving. Some families ask that instead of flowers, you give a donation to a particular charity: it is still permissible to do both. You can also send flowers to a place of business associated with the diseased.

Families or groups of co-workers often go in together for a floral arrangement, but it is perfectly fine for you to also send one on your own. The vast majority of funeral homes will let the families have any flowers left behind and some will even deliver them. Some homes may have restrictions about the sort of plants that may be displayed (e.g. nothing in glass vases), however, so you might want to call ahead and check before placing an order.

Sending flowers to a funeral is appropriate for most any religion. However, if you are not sure, check with a friend of the family that is knowledgeable in this area. If flowers are not the best way to go, ask about what other gesture you can make instead.

If you wish for an arrangement to really reflect the deceased, choose flowers or an arrangement style that has some connection to them and their tastes. This can be something well known to everyone or just something that was special to your own relationship.